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5 tango clubs to visit in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Alex Malcolm, founder and managing director of bespoke travel company Jacada Travel, and George Warren, director of travel, share where they get their tango fix in the Argentinian capital.

1. Club Almagro

almagro

In one of the city’s most renowned tango neighbourhoods sits the legendary Club Almagro. An old club with a very special historic yet lively ambience, it has seen many a tango festival through the years. A former social club with basic infrastructure, participants range from younger ones to the oldies, from beginners to polished and performance quality dancers. A night at Club Almagro is always a fun night, and one to remember.

Medrano 688, Almagro
www.facebook.com/almagrotangoclubpagina

2. La Catedral

An eccentric place with an underground vibe, there are tango classes and milongas (a place or an event where tango is danced) every day. The food is excellent and they have vegan and vegetarian choices. La Catedral is in an old building, formerly a grain store and then a factory; it has now been renovated with wooden floors and decorated with simple basic furniture. Lighting is dim. Its rather hippie and relaxed ambience is popular with young people and “non-traditional” travellers. Sarmiento 4006, Almagro www.lacatedralclub.com

3. Villa Malcolm

Another option in the Almagro neighbourhood, Villa Malcolm’s vibe is nice and simple and boasts a live orchestra. It offers classes and milongas every Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Food choices revolve mainly around sandwiches and empanadas (turnovers), washed down with wine, beer, sodas and spirits. Located in a local club of the same name, it attracts a combination of younger crowds and old-school social club members.

Av Cordoba 5064, Almagro
www.csdvillamalcolm.com.ar/search/label/Tango; www.zumtango.com

4. Club Gricel

A photo posted by @a_at_amsterdam on

Club Gricel hosts classes and milongas daily except on Sundays. A former unidad basica (where local supporters of a political party gather), the space has since been renovated with impeccable wooden floors and golden columns, and now resembles an opulent theatre. Tables are located around the dance floor, offering diners a good view of the dancers. A must-try are the empanadas that stand out by far among the menu offerings. You’ll find mostly adult groups of traditional tango dancers, all impeccably dressed; most of the participants are regulars although newcomers are also welcome.

La Rioja 1180, Boedo
www.clubgriceltango.com.ar

5. Sunderland Club
Sunderland Club is a prestigious and well-known milonga that has been running since 1919. The setting is a well-lit former basketball stadium with mosaic flooring. The place appears rather tired yet remains ever popular, with tourists making up half the crowd. Classes are held on Mondays and Wednesdays, although it is the milonga on Saturdays that shouldn’t be missed. The Villa Urquiza style of dance – a classic tango with elegant steps and few firuletes (leg movements) – is unique, and you will often get to see tango exhibitions by internationally renowned competitive dancers.

Lugones 3161, Villa Urquiza
www.sunderlandclub.com.ar/paginas/tango.html