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Explore balsamic vinegar and Rhone wine at these dinners

Taste the wondrous potential of the humble grape.

Il Borgo del Balsamico dinner at Preludio 

Wine isn’t the only grand destiny for grapes though. There’s also balsamic vinegar, that syrupy, complex, aged condiment from Northern Italy. Made from trebbiano or lambrusco grape must, true balsamic is aged in a solera system, and needs a minimum of 12 years of maturation to be considered as such.

If you can’t get enough of the stuff, Preludio will be hosting producer Cristina Crotti of Il Borgo del Balsamico for a one-night only, 8-course degustation dinner with their vinegars as the focus. Produced under the Reggio Emilia DOP, which neighbors Modena, Il Borgo’s precious nectar undergoes maturation in aged casks handed down from Crotti’s father. 

While you can expect Preludio’s signature dish, la cortina – butternut squash agnolotti with 25 years-aged balsamic vinegar and parmesan sauce – to be served, Il Borgo’s vinegar will also be featured in everything including other savouries, pastry, and even beverages. 

Happening 17 October. Book here

(Related: Preludio: What we think about the latest fine-dining restaurant in town)

 

Scampi with miso and nuts from Braci

Paul Jaboulet Aine Wine Dinner at Braci

Proving that Italian cuisine doesn’t necessarily have to pair with Italian wines, Braci will be holding a pairing dinner with renowned producer Paul Jaboulet Aine. The estate covers 26 different appellations in the Rhone area, and has over 185 years of winemaking history.

Hosting the dinner will be brand ambassador Gwenaele Chesnais, who will be walking diners through some of Rhone’s most famous grapes and regions. Expect a 5-course dinner from Braci, with such delights as scampi with miso and nuts; as well as pigeon tortellini. There’ll also be perennial Braci favourites like foie gras semifreddo with syrupy fig vincotto.

(Related: Object of Desire: The Dalmore L’Anima, Aged 49 Years)

One of the main highlights will be a chance to compare two vintages – 1988 and 2006 – of their critically acclaimed Hermitage La Chapelle, a 100% Hermitage Syrah that’s emblematic of the region. Besides the age of the wines, the two years also offer a chance to taste the shift (if any) in the winemaking, since 2006 was the year the estate came under new ownership, and moved towards natural winemaking practices. Both wines will be paired with a hearty dish of lamb loin with mushrooms, hazelnuts and zucchini.

Happening 23 October, 7pm. Call 6866-1933 to book. 

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