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The luxury hotel group Six Senses is to open in London

Look forward to a luxurious Six Senses in what was once the premises of Whiteleys, London's first department store, come 2023.

A bastion of luxury hotels, which is home to such names as the Shangri-La, the Savoy, the Intercontinental and the Dorchester, London will soon be graced with a new Six Senses, which is set to open in the British capital in three years’ time. The high-end chain, which is committed to sustainable and environmentally friendly policies, Six Senses was voted the “world’s best hotel group” at the Global Wellness Summit in 2018. Now it is about to write a new page in its history with an establishment in the former premises of the London department store Whiteleys.

(Related: Why wellness is key for Six Senses hotels and properties, according to CEO Neil Jacobs)

In the heart of the Bayswater district, the onetime department store which was redeveloped as a shopping center with a cinema and bowling alley in the 1980s, will be transformed into a hotel, wellness club and spa with 110 guest rooms and suites with a minimum size of 355 square feet (33 m2).

There will also be 14 branded residences for wealthier customers, whose owners will be able to tap into all the privileges that come with a stay at the Six Senses, including concierge services and customised interior design.

(Related: Former Scotland Yard headquarters reopens as luxury hotel)

An essential aspect of the Six Senses brand, the spa, which will be one of the main features of the new hotel, will offer guests and opportunity to relax in a space reminiscent of an old-fashioned London underground station. There will also be a 3,500-square feet (325 m2) fitness area and 65-foot (20-meter) long indoor swimming pool.

(Related: Here’s what a night in the Six Senses Duxton’s Skylight suite feels like)

Other highlights include an Alchemy Bar, a relaxation room with vaulted ceilings and coworking spaces – embodying the theme of non-conventional wellness and connectivity, a callback to the historical significance of Whiteleys and how it has brought people together since the 1980s.

Photo credit: Lightfield for Foster + Partners