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The Peak team looks back on the diversions that made our childhood

How we spent our days long before the digital age descended upon us.


Jennifer Chen
Editor
I never understood the appeal of dolls, plush toys or kitchen sets. Books have always been the source of my entertainment. I would be reading Grimms’ Fairy Tales or The Wonderful Wizard of Oz at family gatherings, until my father kicked me out of the room to spend time with my cousins.

(Previously debated: Just how much should men shave?)

I had very fleeting dalliances with thingmaker and playdoh, and played carom with the family, but my one true love: stuffed toys. My favourite was a stuffed rabbit, and she was the runt of the lot at Daimaru – smaller in size at the same price – but I wanted only her. Sally still lives with me, now grey and in a tattered dress, but nonetheless beloved.

 Adeline Wong
Sub-Editor
Denise Kok
Features Editor
Clam-shaped Polly Pocket toys, with their tiny worlds and even tinier figurines, set a large stage for my mind’s eye. After Mattel bought over Bluebird Toys in 1998, the play sets were reissued in bigger sizes, which eroded much of its charm. Today, the Mattel-era Polly Pocket toys have achieved vintage toy status – with prices for complete sets edging upwards with each passing year.

Having been a football fan since the age of nine, it has to be Subbuteo. Unlike foosball where you’re confined to the generic red and blue team fixed onto the table, you can purchase different teams with Subbuteo and the figurines had teams’ jerseys painted on them. Best of all, I got Singapore to win my version of the World Cup.

 
Fazlie Hashim
Art Director
Lynette Koh
Watches & Fashion Editor
Barbie dolls! Loved playing with them – i.e. putting them in various (some scandalous) situations with Ken et Al, chopping off their hair, and occasionally decapitating them.

(Previously debated: #LifeBeyondGrades: Are you satisfied with where your PSLE score has taken you?)

Photo by Irene van der Poel on Unsplash